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Terminal 2 Parking Plaza at the San Diego International Airport earns Envision Gold

The Terminal 2 Parking at the San Diego International Airport (SAN) has received the Envision Gold award for sustainable infrastructure. This is the second project at SAN to receive an Envision award. To reach Gold status, a project must demonstrate that it delivers a wide range of heightened environmental, social, and economic benefits to the host and affected communities.

“The San Diego County Regional Airport Authority is committed to ensuring that all of our capital projects meet the highest standards of environmental and financial sustainability,” said Kim Becker, the Airport Authority’s President/CEO. “We could not be more proud that the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure has recognized our efforts with the Envision Gold award for the Terminal 2 Parking Plaza.”

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Fairfax County’s Huntington Levee Earns Envision Bronze

The Huntington Levee project in Fairfax County, Virginia is the recent recipient of the Envision Bronze award for sustainable infrastructure.

The Huntington Levee project consists of two main elements: a levee that runs parallel to Cameron Run that consists of an earthen embankment and a series of steel-reinforced concrete panels formed in the shape of an I, known as an I-wall, as well as a two-stage pumping station located at the east end of the levee. The levee itself is 2,800 feet long, beginning west of Fenwick Drive and running eastward. The earthen embankment portion of the levee is between 6 and 11 feet high, with a 4-foot high I-wall situated on the top. The top of the levee is 13 feet wide and includes an 8-foot wide asphalt recreational trail. The project also includes a collection drain system to control ground water seepage, new storm drains to connect the existing storm drains to the pumping station, and concrete channels and a vegetated swale to divert stormwater collected behind the levee to the pumping station. The whole system has been designed to protect the community from extreme 100-year flooding events—floods that have a one per cent chance of occurring in any given year.

Fairfax County’s Department of Public Works and Environmental Services delivered this award-winning sustainable project in close collaboration with lead engineer Arcadis U.S., Inc., whose team included Michael Baker International and William H. Gordon, Inc.  Regulatory partners included FEMA and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. Archer Western was the construction contractor.

“This project is vital to ensuring the safety of the Huntington community from risks associated with flooding. Hundreds of people in the area can rest assured they are better protected as a result of this project,” said Melissa Peneycad, ISI’s Acting Managing Director. “ISI is pleased to award this project with Envision Bronze for sustainable infrastructure.”

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Power Distribution Improvements Project at the Bowery Bay Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility earns Envision Silver

The BB-215 Power Distribution Improvements Project at the Bowery Bay Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility (WRRF) located in Astoria, Borough of Queens, New York, has received the Envision® Silver award for sustainable infrastructure.

The Bowery Bay Wastewater Resource Recovery Facility (WRRF) has a current dry weather flow design capacity of 150 million gallons per day (MGD) and a maximum wet weather flow capacity of 330 MGD. Originally constructed in 1939, the WRRF has undergone several major expansions and upgrades to serve its current drainage area of approximately 15,200 acres. To continually provide the important service of wastewater treatment and resource recovery to the surrounding community, the facility’s equipment is periodically upgraded to the increase efficiency. In addition, repairs to the facility are periodically required, especially after major storm events such as Hurricane Sandy. The latest Power Distribution Improvements Project—the project submitted for third-party verification against the Envision sustainable infrastructure framework—involves: consolidation of the facility-wide power distribution system: conversion of the facility’s remaining 208 volt distribution systems and equipment loads to 480 volt; removing obsolete motor control centers and equipment; replacing electrical equipment, motors, and associated wiring; replacing the 4160 volt synchronous bus and 4 utility service paralleling reactors in the main substation; and providing new mimic panels in the main substation and facility control room to improve operator safety.

The primary goal of the Power Distribution Improvements Project is to provide reliable service to the 850,000 people in the community, and sustainability has been a major focus for the project team since the project’s initial inception. For this reason, the project team pursued Envision verification to acknowledge and validate the proactive sustainability outcomes for Bowery Bay WRRF.

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Naples Bay Restoration and Water Quality Improvements at the Cove Project Earns Envision Silver

Naples Bay and its contributing watershed have been dramatically altered by development over time. Associated with various water management projects, the watershed of Naples Bay has expanded from approximately 10 square miles in size to its current 160 square miles.

Enhancing water quality for its residents, visitors, and neighbors is an important part of the City’s environmental stewardship. To this end, the City identified the need to investigate the ecological and environmental conditions at the Cove Pump Station outfall. Analysis of the existing conditions at the outfall identified significant sediment transport, a low functioning ecosystem, and impaired hydraulic conditions arising from the operation of the Cove Pump Station that serves Basin III (otherwise known as Naples Bay). The project team performed an in-depth analysis of stormwater Basin III, undertook City-wide planning initiatives and historical stormwater improvements to guide the design through conceptual and preliminary design stages for final City Council approval. Stakeholder involvement in the project was identified at the outset as a chief priority, with the project team holding a public information meeting to solicit feedback from potentially affected residents and environmental organizations such as The Conservancy of Southwest Florida. The project supports the 20-Year Naples Bay Restoration plan by incorporating water quality improvements with natural wetland restoration in the form of a “living shoreline” concept. To learn more about this award-winning project, please Click Here.

Cedar River Flood Control System in New Bohemia/Sinclair District earns Envision Bronze

The City of Cedar Rapids’ Cedar River Flood Control System in the New Bohemia/Sinclair District in Iowa is the recent recipient of the Envision Bronze rating for sustainable infrastructure. The Cedar Rapids project is the third Envision award granted to an infrastructure project in the state of Iowa.

The project includes a permanent levee structure; a gatewell which allows the City to block off the storm sewer from the Cedar River, preventing flooding through the storm sewer system; a pump station that allows water to be pumped out of the detention area to the Cedar River; a detention basin and other stormwater best management practices such as bioretention areas; and recreational amenities such as a 12’ walking trail.

The Cedar River Flood Control System in the New Bohemia/Sinclair District is part of a larger flood protection effort, known as the Cedar River Flood Control System (FCS). The FCS is designed to convey the same water volume as the catastrophic flood in 2008 that crested over 31 feet, 19 feet above flood level and damaged over 5,300 homes, 900 businesses, and 300 public buildings and directly affected more than 18,000 citizens.

The City of Cedar Rapids worked in close collaboration with Stanley Consultants, HDR, and Anderson Bogert to deliver this award-winning sustainable project.

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The Reconstruction of Oregon Avenue in Washington, D.C. Earns Envision Silver Award for Sustainability

The District Department of Transportation (DDOT) Reconstruction of Oregon Avenue project is a recent recipient of the Envision Silver Award. The Envision framework rates sustainable infrastructure projects across the full range of environmental, social, and economic impacts. The Oregon Avenue project is the first in the District of Columbia to earn a prestigious Envision sustainable infrastructure award.

The design resolves significant transportation deficiencies along a 1.7-mile corridor, including deteriorating pavements, roadway geometry, inconsistent roadway width, stormwater drainage, transportation structures, and roadway lighting, as well as sight distances and pedestrian facilities.

Volkert, Inc. – a leading provider of transportation and infrastructure consulting services – worked in close collaboration with DDOT to deliver this award-winning, sustainable project design.

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Lacombe Main Street Program Receives Envision Silver Award

The Lacombe Main Street Program has received the Envision® Silver Award for sustainable infrastructure, designated by the Institute for Sustainable Infrastructure (ISI). To reach Silver status, a project must demonstrate that it delivers a range of environmental, social, and economic benefits to the local community. The Lacombe Main Street Program is the first project in the Province of Alberta to earn an Envision Award. The City of Lacombe worked in close collaboration with Stantec and Pidherney’s Inc. to deliver this award-winning sustainable infrastructure project which has also recently been recognized with the American Public Works Association (APWA) Alberta Chapter Project of the Year Award.

“The Lacombe Main Street Program is an excellent example of turning an urgent, negative situation—in this case a degraded sanitary sewer system—into a sustainable, vibrant, community- and business-oriented project,” said ISI President and CEO, John Stanton. “ISI is pleased to present this project with an Envision Silver award for sustainable infrastructure. Congratulations to the City of Lacombe and the entire project team on this tremendous achievement.”

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King County’s Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station earns Envision Platinum Award

The $250 million Georgetown Wet Weather Treatment Station (WWTS) in King County, Washington, has received the Envision® Platinum designation for sustainable infrastructure. The Georgetown WWTS is the third Envision-recognized project in Washington State and the first to receive the Platinum award.

The Georgetown WWTS project involves the construction of a combined sewer overflow (CSO) wet weather treatment station which will be situated between the Brandon Street and South Michigan Street Regulator Stations, related pipes and a new outfall structure which will release treated water into the Duwamish River. On-site work for this project began in April 2017 and construction of the WWTS is expected to be completed in 2022. Once constructed, the station will be able to treat up to 70 million gallons of combined stormwater runoff and wastewater per day, water that would otherwise have discharged directly into the river without treatment during storm events.

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Platinum for Digester Gas Utilization Project

The Digester Gas Utilization Project at the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant (HWRP) in Los Angeles, California has earned the Envision Platinum award for sustainable infrastructure.

The $127 million Digester Gas Utilization Project is a combined-cycle cogeneration system that converts 7.5 million cubic feet of biogenic digester gas produced daily at the HWRP to electricity and steam which is used as the primary renewable fuel source to meet the Plant’s power and heating demands. The implementation of this system reduces the Plant’s carbon footprint and lowers operating expenses as the Plant is able to reduce the amount of electricity and steam it imports for its operations. In order to accommodate this new system, the project team modified the interior of the HWRP’s Energy Recovery Building—a building that has largely sat vacant since the late 1990’s—to house the new equipment for the Digester Gas Utilization Project.

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